Isabella

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Information

  • My age:
  • 31
  • My favourite drink:
  • I prefer to drink rum
  • I like to listen:
  • I like to listen hip hop
  • What is my hobbies:
  • Collecting
  • My tattoo:
  • None
  • Smoker:
  • Yes

About

Time IN the storytelling process. I spent from late December until early February working on asment around the eastern coast of the United States. I covered more ground than in any of my trips to the states, but more importantly, I was able to spend time immersed in a level lower than spectacle. I had the breathing room to notice the details in the smallest of mundane things. Rushing has little place in long-form documentary storytelling and restricts many from producing something coherent.

Description

Also woven into my stories are camera settings and gear choices.

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The year is Susan and I have been awake for a while. We are filled with anticipation to know what we, and our photo workshop participants, might see on this first day of a two-week Botswana safari. While sipping my tea and snacking on a cookie, I check my camera gear to make sure my camera batteries are fully charged and that I have extra batteries. I also check that I have Delkin Devices 32 GB memory cards in each camera and extra cards to record my images.

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I stowed them in my backpack for easy access while shooting from my window seat in the safari vehicle. As usual, I have two cameras packed and ready for action: one with a telephoto zoom for close-up shots and one with a wide-to medium zoom for environmental shots and portraits.

With those two lenses, I can tell the whole story of my African adventure. I have back-ups of each lens, as well as a Canon mm lens for landscapes, which I keep in our tent. It is still completely dark outside.

lonely babe Elliana

The guard, with a powerful flashlight, is there to guide us on the path to our safari vehicle. We need to be watching for lions and other animals that might be looking for a breakfast of their own. We are in an open camp where wild animals can freely visit—evident by the lion and leopard tracks that are seen on the gravel paths. The photo workshop participants meet at our two safari vehicles. Everyone is sharing their enthusiasm for the adventure that lay ahead.

There is a faint glow to sky as we hop into the two open-top vehicles. We turn off our headlamps. Our guides start the open-top vehicles for maximum photography flexibility and we are on our way. We were leaving at dawn for a very important reason: most action on a safari happens in the early morning and late afternoon.

These are hours when the nocturnal and diurnal animals change positions. This creates opportunities for wildlife movement in beautiful light. From mid-morning to mid-afternoon, the light is often hard and inconvenient for wildlife photography.

After about an hour, we encounter a mommy cheetah and her three cute cubs in perfect light.

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They were all standing under a bush, staring off into the distance, looking for breakfast. Both of our vehicles stop so we can evaluate the scene for the best photographic angle.

naughty biatch Nellie

Our guides, who saw these cheetahs in this location the day before, tell us that the cheetahs have not eaten for three days. They are on the hunt and we will probably see some cool action soon. After about an hour of watching the cheetahs, I—as the leader of my safari vehicle—think we should move on.

Photographer while working search for a story

My group agrees while the other vehicle decides to wait for a magic moment. Our group says goodbye to the others and drives off in search of other animals. We have some good wildlife encounters. We download images, eat, take a nap, have a photo processing session, and then head back to our vehicles for our late-afternoon game drive.

Shortly into our drive, our driver calls the other vehicle on the radio. We learn that the vehicle and the cheetahs have not moved.

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After driving for about an hour, we pull up to the other vehicle. The cheetahs are still under the same bush. We are back in the location for less than a minute when something unexpected happens. I raise my camera with the mm IS lenszoom in tight on the scene and take a shot.

Coincidently, I was also in the exact right position to help me get the shot.

Your story in photos

You could call this dumb luck shot—but luck does favor the prepared and experienced photographer. The perfect afternoon light is fading and it is time to drive back to our camp where we will have more fun as a group.

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One of our guides has an electric guitar and I led the group in a sing-along of The Lion Sleeps Tonight. Photo Video Audio Tech Accessories. Features Photo. July 6, Rick Sammon. I hope you enjoy.

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Prepping While sipping my tea and snacking on a cookie, I check my camera gear to make sure my camera batteries are fully charged and that I have extra batteries. The cleaning process is very important on safari as dust is a main enemy of photography gear. Rick Sammon I have back-ups of each lens, as well as a Canon mm lens for landscapes, which I keep in our tent. On the Path We were leaving at dawn for a very important reason: most action on a safari happens in the early morning and late afternoon.

Waiting for the Moment We wait…and wait. Pack backup gear when traveling to distant lands. Clean your cameras in dusty conditions.

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Canon Explorer of Light and award-winning photographer Rick Sammon has written 42 books on photography and has 30 on-line classes. With more than 40 years of experience, this self-taught photographer has many accomplishments — and many more anticipated for the road ahead.

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